June 26, 2012

Horn of plenty

Summer just started and although it hasn't been a period of plenty (sun, money or good political choices) in our small country, I made this post about the symbol 'Horn of plenty'. It has been a period of plenty rain, disappointed football fans, stupid politicians and opinions about Greece.

When I saw Maria Carp's Batiks (see blogpost 'Give honor to whom it’s due') I noticed these strangely boot-shaped baskets. I recognized it from Batiks by Eliza van Zuylen, but I thought it was just a different shaped decorative French wine basket. There is one basket with a handle which is used a lot on Batik Belanda. Somehow I knew this one had to mean more.

Batiks by Maria Carp

"The cornucopia (in Latin also cornu copiae) or horn of plenty is a symbol of abundance and nourishment, commonly a large horn-shaped container overflowing with produce, flowers, nuts, other edibles, or wealth in some form. Originating in classical antiquity, it has continued as a symbol in Western art, and in North America is particularly associated with the Thanksgiving holiday.
...The cornucopia became the attribute of several Greek and Roman deities, particularly those associated with the harvest, prosperity, or spiritual abundance, such as personifications of Earth (Gaia or Terra); the nymph Maia; and Fortuna, the goddess of luck, who had the power to grant prosperity."
-From Wikipedia


How can I not recognize this symbol, why doesn't it mean anything to me? I must have learned the meaning somewhere along the line?
It's no suprise this symbol was very popular in Batik Belanda. Frankly I'm a bit disappointed about that, colonist ordering Batiks with symbols to show off their luxurious lifestyles or to ask or wish for more. It's like Gwen Stefani singing:"Cha-ching cha-ching we're loaded and we're not gonna blow it"' (or 'If I was a rich girl', but the song is from a musical so I can condone).

Once you're aware of the meaning of a symbol, you see it everywhere. In snack-bars, on houses, in a lot of Batik Belanda's and even in a Frida Kahlo painting.
She is throwing up her 'horn of plenty' which is more a horn of all the bad stuff that she found on her way. 'Without Hope' is made in 1945. She had just recovered from a surgery, when a doctor told her she could eat everything again. She was so skinny the doctors fed her mashed food every two hours. On the back of the painting she wrote a rhyme: "A mí no me queda ya ni la menor esperanza...Todo se mueve al compác de lo que encierra la panza". ("I do not have any hope... In my belly everything keeps moving on/the whole time"). The author Hayden Herrera of the biography 'Frida' thinks she got the idea for the painting when she threw up in bed over her easel. She paints herself crying, the horn filled with a pig, a chicken, brain, a turkey, a sausage, a fish and a sugar skull with the name 'Frida' written on it.

'Without Hope' by Frida Kahlo

This use of the symbol 'horn of plenty' feels more suiting, but maybe the symbol can also be interpreted as 'you reap what you sow'. Symbols can gain or lose meaning, changed or adapted in time, carrying out new messages, but they will always tell something about the period in which they where used most.

June 19, 2012

Temporary carpet for tropical birds


Making a ricecarpet of birdseeds for the tropical birds of Taman Indonesia










For more pictures of tropical birds see my previous post 'Tropical birds at Taman Indonesia'

For more photos of the 'ricecarpet' see www.sabinebolk.nl

June 18, 2012

Tropical birds at Taman Indonesia


Gelatiks

Yesterday I was honored to make a ricecarpet for the tropical birds at Taman Indonesia (See photos on www.sabinebolk.nl). It was great working will being surrounded by these colourfull, weird and beautiful sounding birds from Indonesia fly around me. It felt like being on holiday or in the jungle. Taman Indonesia is really a little paradise on earth. For everyone who loves Indonesia and its wildlife this is the place to be! Here some pictures of the wildlife that inspired me while making the temporary carpet!

Muntjacs





Wallaby

Animal park Taman Indonesia is open every day from 10h till 18h. They organize all sorts of extra activities through out the year like Pasars, more info on www.taman-indonesia.nl

June 11, 2012

Batik Statement III


"I'am wearing Parang Pattern inspired of Batik Fractal collections. I love all batik patterns in this photo because they're colorful, diverse, look very modern, but of course the root is Indonesia tradition."
Batik Statement by Nancy Margried from Bandung-based design atelier Batik Fractal.
Inspiring Batiks and an inspiring story behind it, so make sure to watch this video below! Great to receive this picture and learn more about this new and upcoming design atelier from Indonesia. In September 2009 I already posted a short video about them on my blog, see blogpost 'Workshop frisika fractal batik'.
They give Batik a new and improved future. Lovely designs made with modern and tradition techniques based on historical Batik patterns. Great, keep up the good work Batik Fractal!



Got inspired? Get your Batik on! Make a picture of yourself wearing your favorite Batik and send it to me by email or post it on my Facebook wall. For inspiration see the previous "Batik Statements" or check out photos from fashion-bloggers and in fashion-magazines (tip: sunny, nice locations, lots of colours and good memories).
If you're not sure if your favorite patterned fabric is a Batik, don't hesitate to share. Maybe it's printed, or with the same technique as Batik, just tell me why you like this pattern and add a detail picture so I can find out what kind of fabric it is! Looking forward to your Batik fashion statements!

June 10, 2012

Temporary carpets on unexpected places








For this post temporary carpets I didn't find while visiting museums, but by watching TV. The Indian sandcarpet is from episode 1 'The Blessing Way' of The X-Files season 3. Mulder has a near death experience in the dessert and they save him with this Navajo ceremony.


"Through your actions you have the power to shape your own future"
- Kencho










This ricecarpet is from Bruce Parry's Going Tribal episode Journey to the Clouds: Bhutan. "Bruce treks for ten days into the high mountains in the tiny Himalayan kingdom of Bhutan where he stays for a month with the isolated Layap people. They are devout Buddhists and yak herders, cut off from the outside world for half the year by deep snow." His host Kencho, who was trained to become a monk, shows him the principles of the Tibetan version of Buddhism mixed with animistic beliefs. He makes a "Wheel of Existence" with rice, explaining that your deeds determine on which side of the wheel you will end.

June 7, 2012

Batik Statement II


These great photos were posted on my Facebook. Barbara van Kooten, who sent me the first Batik Statement, visted the cemetery of Sultans. It is an obligation to wear traditional Batik of Yogyakart while doing so. Also it showes your respect.
On the pictures Barbara, Eric, Pinta, Maya and Vaida Poland in beautiful traditional Batiks on a beautiful and spiritual location. Thanks for sharing!



Got inspired? Get your Batik on! Make a picture of yourself wearing your favorite Batik and send it to me by email or post it on my Facebook wall. For inspiration see my post 'Sometimes I wish I was a fashion blogger' or check out photos from fashion-bloggers and in fashion-magazines (tip: sunny, nice locations, lots of colours and good memories).
If you're not sure if your favorite patterned fabric is a Batik, don't hesitate to share. Maybe it's printed, or with the same technique as Batik, just tell me why you like this pattern! Looking forward to your Batik fashion statements!

June 2, 2012

Batik Statement I

First Batik Statements I received were on my Facebook wall by dear friend & dancer from 'Dance in a ricecarpet' Barbara van Kooten. Her first favorite Batik is the one she wore during her performance of 'Dance in a ricecarpet' at Argument Vertoningsruimte in Tilburg. The photo is made by Martijn Stadhouders.
I bought the Batik she is wearing in Yogyakarta. I chose one with a Chinese style and typical colour red. I'm really fond of this style of Batik and because Barbara grandmother was Chinese Indonesian, I thought it would be fitting to let her wear a Batik showing those roots during 'Dance in a ricecarpet'.
Gerry de Wit, Koen de Wit's mother, made of this Batik a beautiful corset (see post 'Premiere voor de ouders van Koen' on my site). It fit perfectly and it really looked great with the flamenco skirt and Frida Kahlo hairdo. A great first 'Batik Statement'!
Her second favorite Batik is the one she wore on her weddingday. On this pretty picture she is together with Joko's grandmother. Congratulations and keep on wearing those Batiks!

Got inspired? Get your Batik on! Make a picture of yourself wearing your favorite Batik and send it to me by email or post it on my Facebook wall. For inspiration see my post 'Sometimes I wish I was a fashion blogger' or check out photos from fashion-bloggers and in fashion-magazines (tip: sunny, nice locations, lots of colours and good memories). Looking forward to your Batik fashion statements!